By Simon Harley

Simon is a 27-year old naval historian who lives and works in his home county of Cumbria and has travelled extensively on business across North America and Western Europe. Thwarted in his ambition to join the British Army, he strives to serve his country in other ways. A staunch monarchist, he has been a supporter of the hereditary principle all his life and firmly believes the hereditary peerage should continue to have an important rôle in government. His love of the Lords notwithstanding, he could be labelled a moderate progressive.

“House of Lords Reform: What Next?” A response

On 17 October 2013 the Political and Constitutional Reform Committee of the House of Commons (PCRC) published its report, House of Lords Reform: What Next?1 The Friends of the Hereditary Peerage (FHP) would like to address that part of the report which directly affects the future of the excepted hereditary peers in the House of Lords. The FHP takes issue with the PCRC’s conclusion that there is “broad-based and significant support” for ending by-elections to fill vacancies amongst the number of excepted hereditary peers in the House of Lords.2 The PCRC took evidence from 14 witnesses and written evidence from 25…

Progress of Lords Reform

Following the 2010 General Election the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats formed a coalition government.  The coalition agreement stated that a committee would be formed to bring forward a draft motion on Lords reform by December, 2010.  This motion wasn’t published until May, 2011.  The bill which was introduced by the government on 27 June, 2012, provided for a second chamber which over a ten year transitional period would be transformed into a largely elected body.  After much opposition in the House of Commons the bill was withdrawn without a second reading. There are currently three bills concerning Lords reform progressing through Parliament: On…